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Captivated by Music

A musician friend has been augmenting her busy performing and traveling schedule with visits to a prison to perform for the inmates. She plays classical music for these men, some of whom have never listened to this music in their lives. They are more than just receptive to this special treat of live classical music performances– they become hungry and eager for it, and in some cases they quickly develop a deep appreciation and passion for this music. In post-concert surveys they admit to being deeply moved, and having their hearts and souls touched. They’re also experiencing the gift of people caring enough to visit from the “outside” and engage with them to bring a new and enriching experience. The inmates are not the only ones having a new and enriching experience, either. You can read more about these extraordinary interactions here: https://www.insidethearts.com/neoclassical/2016/04/tonight-i-didnt-feel-like-an-inmate/

Happy Day!

Some of the holiest of religious holidays overlapped this year – the Jewish observance of Passover began one day after the Christian celebration of Palm Sunday and continues just past Easter Sunday. A lot of the music on Sunday Baroque is religious because the musicians in the baroque era often worked for the church, but our weekly musical gathering is ecumenical and inclusive. It’s a celebration of the MUSIC, and I hope each listener is nurtured and uplifted in a personal and meaningful way, whatever that may be.

A Milestone

Last week, I had the pleasure of spending several days in Austin, Texas helping KMFA radio station celebrate its 50th anniversary. That’s a rare and wonderful milestone for any radio station, and it’s extraordinary for one with a classical music format.

Concert etiquette

While attending a chamber music concert today, I noticed how well everyone in the audience seemed to understand the “rule” of not clapping between movements. And while this was clearly a knowledgeable and attentive group of veteran concertgoers, it also reminded me of something a wise friend once said: he loves hearing people clap at the “wrong” time during concerts because it means someone new is attending!

With a little help from my friends

I recently organized a benefit concert for a non-profit agency that provides free tutoring to adults who need help improving their literacy skills. An array of friends donated their time and energy: musicians shared their talents, other friends rolled up their sleeves and gathered raffle items, designed and printed the programs, hosted a lavish post-concert reception, and provided muscle power to set up and break down the chairs and tables.

March is Early Music Month

All across North America, musicians, ensembles, publications, broadcasters and music lovers are celebrating Early Music Month throughout March. There is plenty to celebrate! Thanks to decades of renewed interest in baroque and early music, there are many terrific musicians with expertise and sensitivity for the repertory, and the level of performing quality and scholarly expertise has never been higher.

Just what the doctor ordered

Last week I was rehearsing for an upcoming concert with two other musicians, one of whom is not only a fine pianist but also a cardiac surgeon. To accommodate her schedule, we rehearsed in the lobby of the hospital where there is a fine quality grand piano. It was purchased specifically to allow for these spontaneous musical encounters by patients, staff, and visitors.

My Favorite Things – Valentine’s Edition

It’s Valentine’s Day, when many people’s expectations are high for romance. Candy, flowers, cards and romantic dinners are OK, but what moves me even more is MUSIC. With that in mind, these are a few of my favorite things — baroque and early music that is luscious and romantic and perfect for ANY time, not just a fleeting holiday. Always the perfect fit.

Good for the heart, mind and soul

An article in the NY Times recently featured people who turn to making music in retirement. (Joanne Kaufman 1/29/17) Some were returning to playing instruments they played as children, while others were learning for the first time. Their passion for music had been deferred for a variety of reasons — time, money, careers, families, perfectionism, and other distractions.