Month: July 2017

Classical music’s future

Rumors of classical music’s demise are greatly exaggerated. As long as I can remember, people have been pronouncing classical music as dying or dead. But last week, I had the pleasure of interviewing a young violinist who doesn’t share that view. In some ways Michelle Ross has pursued a traditional path for a classically trained musician: earning a Juilliard School degree, studying Johann Sebastian Bach’s music from a deeply scholarly perspective, and making her debut recording of music by Bach on a borrowed Stradivarius violin.

Michelle Ross and Suzanne Bona

Violinist Michelle Ross and Sunday Baroque Host Suzanne Bona

But the twenty-something also took to the streets of New York to play Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas in some unlikely places: a firehouse, the Staten Island Ferry, and a soup kitchen, to name just a few. Concert halls are fine, but she wanted to bring live performances of Bach’s music into people’s everyday lives. So … she did. For her, the single most important thing is access. Give people access to the music, and it can change lives. She believes (and I agree) that the music speaks for itself. All these years, I’ve mostly ignored the pessimists, and Michelle Ross and her optimism renewed my faith. I hope you’ll listen to my conversation with Michelle Ross, and be encouraged by her message, too.

Listen to our conversation.

Party like the Founding Fathers

The “official” baroque era was 1600-1750. To put that into some context, George Washington was born in 1732, Thomas Jefferson was born in 1743, and Benjamin Franklin was born in 1706. They were all born during the baroque era! We know these men primarily for their roles as founding fathers of our country, but there were many other facets to their complicated lives, and music was among their interests. Benjamin Franklin was an enthusiastic music lover who played several instruments, and even invented one: the glass armonica. Thomas Jefferson described music as the “favorite passion” of his soul, and was an avid violin player who owned several violins and a huge library of music. And George Washington *liked* music a great deal, but only as a listener — he admitted he couldn’t carry a tune or play any instruments.

So, however you are celebrating the Fourth of July holiday, I heartily encourage you to choose baroque music as your soundtrack and party like the Founding Fathers! www.SundayBaroque.org/listen